Malta Today: Libyan nationals seeking asylum in Malta turned drug dealers

Ahmed Al Allagi, who lives in shared accommodation in Msida, was arrested in St. Augustine Street, St. Julians, after police moved in after they spotted him selling cannabis, Malta Today reported. [Vice]
A police inspector in Malta has stated that a large number of Libyan nationals, seeking asylum in Malta, are involved in the drugs trade, adding on Malta Today website that despite all the efforts to curb it, law enforcement was seemingly unable to stem the influx of drugs from Africa.

According to the website, a 27-year-old Libyan asylum seeker by the name Ahmed Al-Allagi appeared before magistrate Consuelo Scerri Herrera after being arrested, while trying to sell drugs to a young Italian couple in Paceville in the early hours of Saturday morning.

Ahmed Al Allagi, who lives in shared accommodation in Msida, was arrested in St. Augustine Street, St. Julians, after police moved in after they spotted him selling cannabis, Malta Today reported.

“He showed me what he had, a bag of marijuana. As we were looking at it, the police arrived.” The Libyan had asked for €20 for the drugs. “It was in my girlfriend’s hands but we had not bought it at that point.” Asked by the prosecution about the where the man had been carrying the drugs, he said that the accused had been storing the drugs in a plastic sachet in his right shoe, according to Malta Today.

Al Allagi, represented by lawyer Patrick Valentino, pleaded not guilty and requested bail, which was objected to by the prosecution, on a number of grounds, added Malta Today.

Malta Today also reported that Prosecuting Police Inspector Trevor Micallef pointed out that Al Allagi had also been arrested when he first arrived in Malta for using a false document, but had subsequently claimed asylum, however; the court granted Al Allagi bail, against a deposit of €1000 and a personal guarantee of €2000 and ordering him to obey a curfew, but he is understood to have been remanded in custody after being unable to provide the deposit.

“A lot of Libyans and Somalis who come here seeking shelter are being found with drugs,” observed the Inspector, later commenting that the relentless onslaught – and the additional administrative workload it caused – was having a negative effect on the morale of his officers, concluded Malta Today.

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